bits of bio

A bitesize review of science that enables bit.bio technology to exist

It was in 2012 that Yamanaka and Gurdon received the Nobel prize for showing that cells can be reprogrammed back into stem cells. Yamanaka and Gurdon’s work was truly a revolutionary moment because it meant we could now generate stem cells from any individual. It created renewed attention around the concept that cells can be reprogrammed and was certainly an inspiration for the science that is now the foundation of bit.bio.

It also inspired us to create this mini series – we asked our scientists to nominate and record a short summary of the key papers that they think of as seminal in the field.

Each video is around 2 minutes long which is why we call it #bitsofbio. If you want to contribute a video of a paper, then contact us – communications@bit.bio

The developmental capacity of nuclei transplanted from keratinized skin cells of adult frogs

2021

Dr Daniel Ortmann, Head of Discovery
bits of bio
bit.bio

Induction of pluripotent stem cells from adult human fibroblasts by defined factors

2021

Dr Anne-Claire Guénantin, Senior Scientist
Bits of bio
bit.bio

In vivo reprogramming of murine cardiac fibroblasts into induced cardiomyocytes

2021

Dr Will Bernard, Senior Scientist
Bits of bio
bit.bio

Direct conversion of fibroblasts to functional neurons by defined factors

2021

Dr Tony Oosterveen, Senior Scientist
Bits of bio
bit.bio

Stepwise reprogramming of B cells into macrophages

2021

Dr Thomas Moreau, Head of Research
Bits of bio
bit.bio

Haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells

2021

Dr Thomas Moreau, Head of Research
Bits of bio
bit.bio

Discover more resources

Webinars

Posters

Journals

Videos